Tuesday, August 31, 2010

ABC Wednesday - G

           In the Philippines we call this Guyabano, but in South America they call it Guabano or Sour sop

Guyabano/Soursop Fruit Nutrition 

Guyabano belongs to the family of Annonaceae, (A. muricata L.). The flesh of the fruit consist of a white edible pulp that is high in carbohydrates and considerable amounts of Vitamin C, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Potassium and dietary fiber. Guyabano is low in cholesterol, saturated fat and sodium. No only is guyabano a good health food, it also taste delicious. The tree and fruit is known in various names: Guyabano in Filipino, Soursop in English, Graviola in Brazil, and Guanabana in Spanish.

About the Guyabano The heart shaped / oblong guyabano fruit has a dark green, leathery and spike-like skin that measures from 8 to 12 inches long and can weigh up to 2.5 kilos. The creamy and delectable flesh contains from 60 to 100 black-brown seeds that are indigestible and non-edible.

The guyabano tree is relatively small. It usually grows from 8 to less than 20 feet high and is sensitive to very cold temperatures. The guyabano tree requires a lot of water, warmth and humidity and is usually grown in the tropics. It is cultivated commercially in Central & South America, West Africa, Asia and South Florida in limited numbers.
 

Products made from Guyabano fruit: Aside from being eaten raw, the guyabano fruit is processed into candies, tarts, shakes, ice-cream, sherbets and other beverages. 

Medicinal Uses of Guyabano
Guyabano has been used as folkloric herbal medicine in many regions thought the world. It is considered to be antispasmodic, sudorific and emetic. A decoction (boiling in water) of guyabano leaves is used to kill bedbugs and head lice.

To reduce fever, a decoction of leaves can be taken internally or the leaves added to bathing water also has the same effect. The crushed fresh leaves are also applied on skin eruptions for faster healing. A poultice of young guyabano leaves is applied on the skin to alleviate rheumatism and other skin infections like eczema. Applied during the healing of wounds, this can result in less or no skin scars. The decoction can also be used as a wet compress on swollen feet and other inflammations.

The juice of the fruit is taken orally as a herbal remedy for urethritis, haematuria and liver ailments.

Studies are underway by leading medical institutes, universities and pharmaceutical companies of the healing properties of guyabano against cancers. Initial findings show that certain compounds and chemicals extracted from guyabano leaves, seeds, fruit and bark appear to kill cancer cells while leaving normal cells remain unaffected.

Other uses of Guyabano

Pulverizing the guyabano seeds and mixing it with soap & water is used as effective spray against caterpillars, armyworms and leafhoppers on plants.

The guyabano leaves are believed to have a tranquilizing and sedative properties. In the Netherlands Antilles, the leaves are placed inside pillows or placed on top of the mattress to induce a good night's sleep. Source: Philippineherbalmedicine.org

                       Guacamole as we call it here and  in the Philippines we call this fruit Avocado!

Avocado/Guacamole Nutrition Information

Avocado is a fruit and a tree. It often said to be the most nutritious fruit in the world - and it is. Avocado provides more than 25 essential nutrients such as protein, potassium, vitamin E, C, B-vitamins, folic acid, iron, copper, phosphorus and magnesium, just to name a few. Avocado also provides calories for energy and beneficial phytochemicals such as beta-sitosterol, glutathione and lutein.


Avocado contains fat, that is why it is a good source of energy, but the fat in avocado is mostly monounsaturated. What should be avoided or reduced is saturated fat that is present in most dairy and animal products. In fact, avocado helps in the absorption of nutrients that are fat-soluble such as alpha and beta-carotene and lutein, when food containing this nutrients are eaten with avocado. Avocado is also high in fiber that is good for the digestive system and the heart.


Overall, avocado is considered a complete food. With vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, calories and fiber with no cholesterol and is sodium free. Avocado is ideal for growing up children, adults and even for babies, especially when blended with other fruits. For athletes, avocado is a nutritious energy booster to rev up the body's strength.
                                              Linking to ABC WEDNESDAY

25 comments:

Jedediah said...

I learned something new :) I had seen a Sugar-apple (Annona squamosa) once, but didn't buy it because it was so expensive. But I had never seen other fruits from that family.

Leo said...

ooh.. nice.. i think we call it butterfruit.. it looks the same... but not sure :)

My ABC Wednesday G

fredamans said...

Very cool subject, and new to me. Learn something new every day!

Sylvia K said...

And I learned something new, too! Always a good thing! Great post for the G Day! And I do love Guacamole! Enjoy your day!

Sylvia

Nanka said...

Love those Avocados. High fat but do enjoy them immensely. :)
Have a great week!!

Rumya said...

Delicious Avocados!!
Interesting Facts too.
Great post for the G week.
Have a good week!!

Paula Scott said...

I've always known that fruit as soursap!
Always learning something new at ABC Weds!

Tumblewords: said...

I didn't know of the fruit-avocado but it does sound wonderful. Avocado is on my lunch plan for this day - thanks for the informative post!

Wanda said...

The first picture looks like Prickly Pears...Good photography.

photowannabe said...

Thanks for the new information. I have never heard of the fruit before. It sounds delightful. Avocados...yummm.... I love them.

Jama said...

I love soursop fruit!

Roger Owen Green said...

very informative!

ROG, ABC Wednesday team

Vernz said...

HI Manang Kim, wahahah, ang dami nito sa uma... hahaha didn't know guacamole pala si avocado hahaha...

I hope you can drop by
My ABC Wednesday here
And HERE TOO

magiceye said...

great! healthy fruit!

snowleopard said...

That was a very educative post. I had never seen these fruits before. Thanks

http://snowleopardshoots.wordpress.com/
http://unpredictableblog.wordpress.com/

megzone said...

wow that was new :)
i knw of Guacamole/avocado or butter fruit as it is called.. but the others.. were surely new :D
btw were there thorns on that Guyabano??

Shey said...

Both love these. Yum! I want to look for guyabano now & have some. :)

John's comments said...

Given that bedbugs are the rise again I'd hold on to your supply! My G is a poem about goodbye. Thank you if you nominated me for the blog of note award last week. Hope your week goes well

Tracy said...

If you can make ice cream out of it then I LIKE IT!

Jenn said...

Yang guyabano ang nami-miss ko talaga! I don't eat avocado the fruit, pero yung Guacamole (the dish) I eat. Weird noh?

Thanks for hopping by my ABC Wed post.

eden said...

I miss our Avocado. Yummmy..

Carolyn Ford said...

We have an avocado tree and love when it produces our most adored fruit! Guacamole...wow, we love it!

Jientje said...

Very interesting post, I learned something new today, I had never seen or heard of Guybano fruit before!

Someone Is Special said...

This is great...

G is for Gamidolatry

--Someone Is Special--

JM said...

I love avocado but I have never tried the fruit on top.

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